Newark, New Jersey Revolutionary War Sites
HOME                 TIMELINE                 ABOUT                 CONTACT                 Website, Text & Photos © 2009 - 2014 Al Frazza   

Atlantic County     Bergen County     Burlington County     Camden County     Cape May County     Cumberland County     Essex County
Gloucester County     Hudson County     Hunterdon County     Mercer County     Middlesex County     Monmouth County     Morris County
Ocean County     Passaic County     Salem County     Somerset County     Sussex County     Union County     Warren County

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SITES IN NEWARK, NEW JERSEY

Newark NJ Historic Sites
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH AND CEMETERY
First Presbyterian Church
Newark New Jersey in the Revolutionary War

First Presbyterian Church and Cemetery
820 Broad St.
Map / Directions to the Newark Presbyterian Church
Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites

(973)642-0260

During the Revolutionary War, Alexander Macwhorter was reverend at the First Presbyterian Church. Macwhorter was a fervent patriot.  He served as a spiritual advisor to American Washington's troops at the time of  the Battle of Trenton, and later as Chaplain to General Henry Knox's Brigade. [1]

The original First Presbyterian Church building suffered serious damage during the Revolutionary War. In 1791, the church was rebuilt, using brownstone quarried in Newark. [2]

A plaque on the front of the church lists the 47 Revolutionary War soldiers and patriots buried in the church cemetery: [3]

John Alling
Samuel Alling
Jabez Baldwin
Moses Baldwin
Sylvanias Baldwin
Stephen Baldwin
David Banks
Nathaniel Beach
Elisha Boudinot
Caleb Bruen
Eleaser Bruen
David Burnet
Abiel Camfield
Thomas Canfield
David Crane
David D. Crane Jr.
David E. Crane
Joseph Crane
Richard Cunningham
Thomas Eagles
Samuel Farrand
Samuel Foster
William Grant
Samuel Hay
Samuel Hayes
David Hays
Stephen Hays
David Hedden
James Hedden
Nehemiah Hedden
Samuel Huntington
Eliphelet Johnson
Samuel Jones
Alexander Macwhorter
John Ogden
Caleb Parkhurst
William Pennington
Jabez Pierson
John Roberts
Uzal Sayrs
William Peartree Smith
Jasper Ten Brook
Daniel Tichenor
David Tichenor
Moses Tichenor
Thomas Ward
Caleb Wheeler
Revolutionary War Sites in Newark
MILITARY PARK
The Wars of America Monument

Newark, New Jersey
Newark NJ Revolutionary War Sites

Military Park
Broad St. and Park Pl.
Map / Directions to Military Park

Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites

Washington's troops camped here during the retreat of 1776. It is believed that Thomas Paine began writing The American Crisis while camped here. [4]

One end of the park has a liberty pole, in the spot where the original stood in the 1700's.  In the park is The Wars of America sculpture, depicted soldiers from all of America's wars, including the Revolutionary War. It was sculpted in 1926 by Gutzon Borglum, who also sculpted Mount Rushmore.

Newark New Jersey in the Revolutionary War
TRINITY CHURCH
Trinity Church - Newark NJ Newark Trinity Church
Newark Trinity Church Newark Trinity Church
Newark in the Revolutionary War Newark Trinity Church - Revolutionary War
Newark Trinity Church - Revolutionary War Newark Trinity Church - Revolutionary War
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral
Broad St. and Park Pl.
Map / Directions to the Trinity Church
Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites
Trinity Episcopal Website
(973)624-4745

A plaque on the church reads:
"Washington and his army, in November 1776, passed beneath the shadow of this tower in masterly retreat across New Jersey to Hills beyond the Delaware, where they gathered strength for the bold blows struck at Trenton and Princeton for American Independence." [5]

Trinity was used as a hospital during the Revolutionary War for wounded British and American troops. The building suffered heavy damage during the war. Due to the damage, a new church building was planned and construction was completed in 1810. Only the tower is from the original church that stood here during the Revolutionary War. [6]

Newark New Jersey in the Revolutionary War
WASHINGTON PARK
Site of the First Academy of Newark
Washington Park
Historic Sites in Newark, NJ
Washington Park
Historic Sites in Newark, NJ

Washington Park
Site of Newark Academy
Broad St. and Washington Pl.
Map / Directions to Washington Park

Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites

The park marks the site of the First Academy of Newark. A boulder monument in the park reads:
"The First Academy in Newark was erected in 1774 by the gifts of generous citizens. Dedicated to learning, it found in time of war a new mission in the cause of liberty, giving useful service as a barracks and hospital for American troops.   On the night of January 23, 1780, it was burned to the ground by a raiding party of British who crossed from New York on the ice and surprised the town.    This school was the forerunner of the present Newark Academy which erected its first building in 1792 at the corner of Broad and Academy Streets. " [7]

An impressive statue of General Washington stands at the entrance of the park.  There is a plaque in the park with a map of Washington's 1776 retreat route across New Jersey, which included Newark.

Newark New Jersey in the Revolutionary War
PLUME HOUSE
Plume House
Historic Sites in Newark, NJ

Plume House
407 Broad St. (at State St.)
Map / Directions to the Plume House

Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites

The Plume house, which now serves as the rectory for the House of Prayer Episcopal Church,  has an interesting history, explained in a plaque on the house:
"This house probably the oldest in Newark, was built by John Plume about 1726, of native sandstone from the neighboring quarries. It witnessed many stirring events of the Revolution, and by it passed Washington's army on its retreat from Long Island. Here in 1887, the Reverend Hannibal Goodwin invented the sensitive film marking a great advance in the art of photography." [10]

According to Newark Historic Destinations Examiner Martha Broyzna:
"in 1777, Ann Van Wagenen Plume became a local legend for standing up to a group of boorish Hessians or German mercenaries fighting for the British. Her husband, Isaac Plume, was away fighting in the Continental Army and Ann was on her own minding the farm. One day she came upon the soldiers chopping wood in her living room, and angrily ordered them out. When one of them threatened to shoot her, she dared him to do it by telling him she was prepared to die. The soldiers promptly left the house.
Days later when the soldiers were still lingering around her property, she locked one of them in her ice house. There are two versions of what happened next. In the first version, the Continental Army arrived and took the Hessian captive, rewarding Ann for her act of heroism by giving her the brass ornament from his helmet. In the second version, the Hessian escaped from the ice house by climbing out a small window, leaving behind his helmet. In both cases, Ann winds up with the brass decoration from his helmet which was then used as the door knocker for the rectory." [11]

Newark New Jersey in the Revolutionary War
PHILLIPS PARK
Newark, New Jersey
Newark NJ Revolutionary War Sites

Phillips Park
Elwood Ave. and Elwood Pl.
Map / Directions to Phillips Park

Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites

A boulder monument commemorates two Revolutionary War soldier encampments at this site: the first under General Washington in 1776, and the second under General Anthony Wayne in 1779.  [12]

Newark New Jersey in the Revolutionary War
OLD STONE SCHOOL HOUSE
& COE WELL CURB
Old Stone School House
Historic Sites in Newark, NJ
Old Stone School House
Historic Sites in Newark, NJ
Old Stone School House and the Coe Well Curb
In Alice Ransom Dreyfuss Memorial Garden at Newark Museum

49 Washington St.
Map / Directions to the Old Stone School at the Newark Museum

Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites

Newark Museum Website

(973) 596-6550
Museum Hours:
Wednesday through Friday: 12–5 p.m.
October–June: Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
July–September: Saturday and Sunday, 12–5 p.m.

Closed Mondays (except Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day & Presidents' Day), Tuesdays, New Year's Day, July 4, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.

A plaque on the house explains:
"Two centuries ago on this spot the seed of  Newark's educational system was planted. The parent school - built in 1728 and burned in 1782 - was succeed by this structure in 1784. Within these modest walls, many of the New Jersey's leaders received their early training. Before this door in 1797, George Washington paused to acknowledge the homage of the pupils" [8]

Next to the school building is the Coe Well Curb. The plaque on it reads:
"Taken from the Coe Quarry at Belmont Avenue and Spruce Street and cut from solid stone by slaves prior to the Revolutionary War.
Washington and his aides drank from the well." [9]

Newark New Jersey in the Revolutionary War
ELISHA BOUDINOT / GENERAL LAFAYETTE MARER
Elisha Boudinot
Historic Sites in Newark, NJ

Elisha Boudinot / General Lafayette Marker
Broad St. and Park Pl.
Map / Directions to the Boudinot / Lafayette Marker

Map / Directions to all Newark Revolutionary War Sites

Located across Park Place from Military Park, the marker reads "On this site stood the residence of Elisha Boudinot, one of Newark's most distinguished citizens, eminent jurist, member of Newark's committee of correspondence, patriot and personal friend of Washington.   Here on September 23, 1824, General Lafayette was entertained on his first visit to Newark. " [13]

Elisha Boudinot was the brother of Elias Boudinot, who served as the president of the Continental Congress from 1782 - 1783.

Sources:

1. ^ The New Jersey Historical Society Guide to the Papers of Alexander Macwhorter, (Newark 2004)  Biographical Note

2. ^ Jean-Rae Turner, Richard T. Koles Images of America: Newark (Portsmouth NH, Arcadia Publishing, 1997) p. 14

3. ^ Names from the church plaque placed by the Nova Caesarea Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 1941

4.  ^ According to the July 5, 2009 article "Newark's Military Park Loses Funding for Renovation" by Philip Read of The Star-Ledger, Newark provided documentation about Thomas Paine writing the beginning of The American Crisis with its grant application.

5. ^ Plaque placed by the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, March 7, 1951

6. ^ The Trinity Church Website: "A Brief History"

7. ^ Placed by the trustees, teachers, graduates and students of the Newark Academy, June 1916. replaced by the Commissioners of the city of Newark, May 1941

8. ^ Old Stone School House plaque dedicated by the Board of Education, placed by the Schoolmen's club assisted by the pupils of the Newark Public Schools, Newark Day, November 3, 1924

9. ^ Coe Well Curb plaque placed by the Nova Casarea Chapter of the Daughters of The American Revolution

10. ^ Plaque erected by the Newark Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, December 1, 1925

11. ^ Martha Broyna, July 21, 2009 "The Ladies of Plume House" Newark Examiner www.examiner.com

12. ^ Phillips Park monument placed by the Nova Casarea Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, May 1916

13. ^ Marker erected in 1924 by the Newark Chapter of the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the American Revolution