Edison, New Jersey Revolutionary War Sites
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REVOLUTIONARY WAR SITES IN EDISON, NEW JERSEY

Revolutionary War Sites in Edison
OAK TREE POND HISTORIC PARK
Site of the Reuben Ayers House

Oak Tree Pond Historic Park
Oak Tree Pond Historic Park
Oak Tree Pond Historic Park
Oak Tree Pond Historic Park

Oak Tree Pond Historic Park
Oak Tree Rd. and Plainfield Rd.
Map / Directions to Oak Tree Pond Historic Park
Map / Directions to all Edison Revolutionary War Sites

This park commemorate the Oak Tree Engagement of June 26, 1777, which was part of the Battle of the Short Hills. There are  several plaques throughout the park explaining the Oak Tree Engagement, and the events leading up it.

One of the markers describes the Reuben Ayers House, which stood here at the time of the Oak Tree Engagement. Reuben Ayres(1730 - March 22, 1793), served in the Revolutionary War as a private in Captain Asher F. Randolph's Company, State Troops, He owned the house and 9 acres of farmland surrounding it. British and Hessian troops looted the house on the day of the Oak Tree Engagement, and burned down the barn. The house itself survived the fighting, and in fact lasted almost another two centuries, until it was demolished in 1968.  Reuben Ayers in buried in the Old Colonial Cemetery in Metuchen. [1]

Edison NJ in the Revolutionary War
ST. JAMES CHURCH
PISCATAWAYTOWN BURIAL GROUND

St. James Historic Church
Edison, New Jersey
Edison, New Jersey
Edison, New Jersey

St. James Church
Piscatawaytown Burial Ground

2136 Woodbridge Ave.
Map / Directions to the St. James Church
Map / Directions to all Edison Revolutionary War Sites

The original St. James Episcopal Church building was built here in 1724. In 1835, a tornado tore through New Brunswick, Piscataway (including what is now Edison), Perth Amboy and then into Staten Island. The original St. James Episcopal Church building was demolished by the tornado, and was then rebuilt using much of the original wood and fixtures. The section in the rear of the church was added in 1913. The cemetery, known as the Piscatawaytown Burial Ground is one of the oldest in Middlesex County; It's oldest readable gravestone is dated 1693. [2]

A historic plaque in front explains the Revolutionary War history of the church and the cemetery: "There was considerable military activity in the Piscatawaytown area in 1776/1777. Woodbridge Avenue was a main land artery for British communications and movement of supplies and troops. The British Army used St. James as a barracks and a hospital from December 1776 to June 1777. Battles were fought at or very near to the church. To the east of this monument is the common grave of British soldiers who died in the Revolutionary War. They were buried in the British breastworks (defensive trench) emplaced along the Post Road (Now Woodbridge Ave). At the request of the opposing American soldiers, the British also buried a number of American soldiers but their resting place is not known." [3]

Sources:

1. ^ • Information about the house drawn from a Save The Oaktree Pond Committee historic plaque at the site, sponsored by TD Bank.
• Reuben Ayres birth, death, and military information from a historic sign at the Old Colonial Cemetery in Metuchen, placed by Historical Commission of Metuchen, 1983. Research by Nora C. Hutton.

2. ^  • Church history details drawn from the historic plaque in front of the church, placed by the Edison Historic Preservation Commission, dedicated September 11, 2004
• Details about the 1835 from the article "Dreadful Tornado", which appeared in The New York Gazette on June 23, 1835 (four days after the tornado). The article was then reprinted on June 27, 1835 in the Niles' Weekly Register. This can be found in the collection:
Niles' Weekly Register, From March 1835 to September 1835 - Vol. XLVIU. or, Volume XII - Fourth Series (Baltimore: H. Niles, 1835) p. 292-293
Available to be read at Google Books here

3. ^  Historic plaque in front of the church, placed by the Edison Historic Preservation Commission, dedicated September 11, 2004